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Sleeping In a Cooler Room = Better Rest (Here's Why!)

February 15, 2018


Sleeping in a cooler room can lead to better rest - here’s why.

If you are one of the approximately 30% of adults who have short-term issues with insomnia, or the 10% who suffer from chronic insomnia, you'll know that even the slightest environmental irritant has the potential to hamper your ability to drift off to dreamland. Room temperature has been reported as one of the most common factors that can inhibit the ability to sleep, with the warmer end of the spectrum being the main culprit.

By now, we all know that sleeping in a cooler room leads to better rest, but why is that so? What is the science behind it? The human body is a complex system that reacts to stimuli in a very interesting way, and the ability to sleep is no exception. Here is a basic look at what we currently know about sleep and environmental temperature:

Cool But Not Cold

Leading sleep specialists recommend an ambient room temperature of between 15 and 20°C. Dipping below 12°C has the same disruptive implications as temperatures over 23°C - in both cases sleep is hampered due to discomfort.

Your Body Cools Down to Go to Sleep

According to Dr. Cameron Van den Heuvel of the University of South Australia, our bodies start to lose heat from its central core about 60 to 90 minutes before we fall asleep, which increases feelings of tiredness in healthy adults. This drop in temperature is not noticeable to the individual, but plays a vital role in becoming sleepy. According to Dr. Van den Heuvel's studies, individuals with sleep onset insomnia present with warmer core body temperatures in the moments before falling asleep when compared to healthy peers. In some cases, the insomniacs had to wait up to four hours for their bodies to cool down sufficiently to initiate sleep. A cooler room temperature can help to expedite the process.

PLUS! Cooler Temperatures Boost Your Metabolism

Another study has found that sleeping in a room of which the temperature is just below 20°C boosts the body's ability to produce brown fat, which burn calories. The test subjects that partook in the study also showed improvements in terms of their insulin sensitivity - an essential component of glucose metabolism.

There you have it - the skinny on why sleeping in a cooler room can lead to better rest. Another way to ensure that you enjoy the best sleep possible, is to assess your sleeping surface. Are you happy with your mattress and bedding? Every person has different comfort requirements, so make this the year that you find the perfect combination for you! Hard, soft, plush - find out which surface is the best fit for your posture and sleeping style, and pave the way to sleeping success in 2018.

Image source: Flickr


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